Feast of the Sea wants to spoil you with tasty seafood this weekend!

Indulging in the best seafood Palm Beach County has to offer doesn’t mean breaking the bank on an impulsive dining experience or special occasion.

Enjoy tasty crustaceans, live music and culinary demonstrations on Saturday, Oct. 22 at the 3rd annual Feast of the Sea Seafood Festival at Meyer Amphitheatre in West Palm Beach. General admission is free from 11 a.m. to 4 pm. and you’ll pay under $8-$12 a dish. Get more info on other feast festivities here.

Photo: feast of the sea west palm beach
Photo Cred: Feast of the Sea on Facebook/Chasin’ a Dream Photography

This year will be the first time award-winning chefs from restaurants such as Table 427Ristorante Santucci and Sandpiper’s Cove compete in hourly competitions called “knife fights.” Sounds intense, right?

While you’ll have a great time tasting bites of food and cheering on talented chefs for free, there’s a chance for you to join in on the exclusive part of the festival if you’re interested.

Starting at 6 p.m., the daytime feast turns into a private, grand tasting where the culinary marksmen from around town step it up a notch and create sparks in front of the crowd. Tickets will run you between $100 and $175. Get them here.

And there’s not a bad spot on the waterfront because this showdown will be projected on a large LED wall. After four rounds, the last chef standing will be crowned the “2016 Maestro del Mar” and be gifted with a $5000 check. Again, intense.

Photo: Feast of the Sea West Palm Beach
Photo Cred: Feast of the Sea on Facebook/Chasin’ a Dream Photography

 


The Deets:

What: #FOTS16

When: 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 22

Where: Meyer Amphitheater

Cost: Free to attend, $45 to taste and $100+ for a seat at the night show. 

Hurricane Matthew: Still boarded up and nowhere to go? Which restaurants are open/closed

Hurricane Matthew gave us a scare, but in the end spared us. In the boarded-up confines of home, that makes us grateful — and a little hungry for some good, hot grub.

So what’s open and what’s closed today, restaurant-wise? Here’s what we’ve got so far:

E.R. Bradley's Saloon bartender Sam Paolillo serves drinks to patrons in West Palm Beach Thursday October 6, 2016. The restaurant will serve food until 3 p.m. and remain open serving only drinks throughout the evening. (Meghan McCarthy / The Palm Beach Post)
Service with a smile: E.R. Bradley’s bartender Sam Paolillo. (Meghan McCarthy/ The Palm Beach Post)

SOUTH

Rapoport Restaurants, south county

All Burt Rapoport-owned restaurants will reopen at 4:30 p.m. for dinner Friday night. This goes for Deck 84, Henry’s and Burt & Max’s in Delray Beach as well as for Bogart’s in Boca Raton.

Max’s Grille, Boca Raton

The popular Mizner Park restaurant reopens at lunchtime Friday.

Beer Trade Co. cafe and beer lounge, Delray Beach and Boca Raton

Are open for business.

The Frog Lounge, Delray Beach

Is open for business.

Josie’s Ristorante, Boynton Beach

Is reopening for lunch and dinner Friday.

Max’s Harvest, Delray Beach

Is reopening for dinner Friday.

Rocco’s Tacos, all locations

They’re reopening at lunchtime.

City Oyster, Delray Beach

Is reopening Friday for regular hours.

Louie Bossi’s, Boca Raton

Is reopening Friday for regular hours.

Caffe Luna Rosa, Delray Beach

Is open for business.

Agliolio Italian Bistro & Bar, Wellington and Boynton Beach

Is open for business at both locations.

Habit Burger, Royal Palm Beach and Delray Beach

Is open for business.

Bud’s Chicken & Seafood, all locations

They are all open for business.

The Living Room, Boynton Beach

Is open for business with live music Friday night.

La Cigale A Taste of the Mediterranean, Delray Beach

Is open for business at 5 p.m. Friday

 

photo bradleys
Things start to return to normal at E.R . Bradley’s in downtown West Palm Beach on Friday, October 7, 2016, the day after Hurricane Matthew brushed the Palm Beach County coast line. (Joseph Forzano / The Palm Beach Post)

CENTRAL/WEST

Maison Carlos, West Palm Beach

Opens for dinner at 5:30 p.m. Friday.  For reservations, call 561-659-6524.

Havana, West Palm Beach

The iconic Cuban restaurant has reopened for business.

Avocado Grill, West Palm Beach

Will reopen at 4:30 p.m. Friday for dinner.

City Cellar at CityPlace, West Palm Beach

Is reopening Friday for regular hours.

ER Bradley’s Saloon, West Palm Beach

Is open for business.

Bistro Ten Zero One at Marriott, West Palm Beach

Is open for business.

Table 26, West Palm Beach

Will reopen at 5 p.m. Saturday.

Cholo Soy Cocina, West Palm Beach

Will reopen Saturday at 5 p.m.

Rocco’s Tacos, all locations

They’re reopening at lunchtime.

Grease Burger, West Palm Beach.

Is reopening Friday for regular hours.

Marcello’s La Sirena, West Palm Beach

Will reopen Friday for dinner. Reservations at 561-585-3128.

Cafe Centro in Northwood, West Palm Beach

Cafe Centro is open for lunch, dinner and deliveries. They will have music tonight, featuring Ray Chang.

Eau Palm Beach Resort restaurants, Manalapan

All resort restaurants reopen at noon Saturday, except for Angle, which reopens at 6 p.m. Oct. 13.

Appicella Pizza, Palm Springs

It’s open and making deliveries.

Lupita’s Tex-Mex, Lake Worth

Is open for business.

Cucina Dell’Arte, Palm Beach

Is open for business.

The Regional Kitchen & Public House, West Palm Beach

Will be open for dinner tonight.

Aioli, West Palm Beach

Is open for business.

PB Catch, Palm Beach

Is open for dinner tonight.

Paneterie, West Palm Beach

Is open for business.

Pistache, West Palm Beach

Is open for business.

Nick & Johnnie’s, Palm Beach

Is open for business.

Habit Burger, Royal Palm Beach and Delray Beach

Is open for business.

Kabuki Sushi Thai Tapas, West Palm Beach and Palm Beach Gardens

Reopens for dinner at 4 p.m. Friday

Buccan, Palm Beach

Reopens for dinner Friday night.

Imoto, Palm Beach

Buccan’s “little sister” next door reopens for dinner Friday night.

Grato, West Palm Beach

Reopens for dinner Friday night.

Dorrian’s Red Hand Pub, West Palm Beach

Is open for business.

Bud’s Chicken & Seafood, all locations

They are all open for business.

Kitchen, West Palm Beach

Reopens for dinner Friday night.

100616 PBDN Meghan McCarthy Royal Palm Way is nearly deserted as Hurricane Matthew approaches Thursday October 6, 2016.
Royal Palm Way, Palm Beach, as seen before Hurricane Matthew’s expected approach. (Meghan McCarthy/ The Palm Beach Post)

NORTH

Calaveras Cantina, Jupiter

The waterfront Mexican restaurant at Harbourside Place reopens for dinner and drinks at 5 p.m. Friday.

McCarthy’s Pub, Tequesta

Will reopen Friday for dinner.

Rocco’s Tacos, all locations

They’re reopening at lunchtime.

Cod & Capers Seafood Market and Cafe, North Palm Beach

Will reopen Saturday for its regular hours.

Ocean Bleu, Tequesta

Will reopen at 5 p.m. Friday for dinner.

Carmine’s Crab Shack, Palm Beach Gardens

Reopens at 4 p.m. Friday for dinner.

Evo Italian in Tequesta

Reopens Friday for dinner at 4:30 p.m., with Happy Hour served until 7 p.m.

The Cooper, Palm Beach Gardens

Reopens Friday for dinner at 5 p.m.

Kabuki Sushi Thai Tapas, West Palm Beach and Palm Beach Gardens

Reopens for dinner at 4 p.m. Friday.

Bud’s Chicken & Seafood, all locations

They are all open for business.

Salute Market, Palm Beach Gardens

Is open for business with a special “Hurricane Matthew” after party Friday

Guanabanas, Jupiter

Reopens for dinner Friday.

NOTE:

Restaurant owners and representatives: Is your restaurant operating on special hours due to Matthew? Let me know at lbalmaseda@pbpost.com.

Hurricane Matthew party: Coniglio restaurants to stay open during storm

Not everyone in Palm Beach County is a freaked-out mess about this hurricane. The folks at E.R. Bradley’s Saloon plan to party right through the storm. In fact, they’re calling the place “The Official Hurricane Landfall Headquarters.”

They’re taking Hurricane Matthew’s approach as a reason to flip into full, old-Florida-watering-hole mode.

The infamous no dancing sign next to the bar at E.R. Bradley's in West Palm Beach. (Richard Graulich / The Palm Beach Post)
Sign at the bar at E.R. Bradley’s in West Palm Beach. (Richard Graulich / The Palm Beach Post)

“This is how we’ve always done it. We stay open and service the downtown area. We become a hub to commiserate and celebrate and just gather,” says Nick Coniglio, whose family owns Bradley’s.

The popular pub perched on the downtown West Palm Beach waterfront has no generator to kick in during a power outage. But Coniglio is not worried.

“We’ve got lots of bagged ice and gas burners and we’re ready to go. And we have staff members who plan to tough it out during the storm,” he said, adding that he will have a police officer on premises as well. He says the restaurant and bar will offer a special $5 hurricane menu.

E.R. Bradley's faces the waterfront in West Palm Beach. (Richard Graulich / The Palm Beach Post)
E.R. Bradley’s faces the waterfront in West Palm Beach. (Richard Graulich / The Palm Beach Post)

Coniglio’s other restaurant, Cucina Dell’Arte in Palm Beach, will be opened during the storm as well, he says. The windows there are boarded up, but the door will be open for customers who want a nice Italian meal and a cocktail.

 

One of the first short-lived menus from E.R. Bradley's in West Palm Beach on December 11, 2014.  (Richard Graulich / The Palm Beach Post)

The restaurants will also be preparing food for delivery by Cravy. (Meals can be ordered at GoCravy.com.)

“These situations bring back that local spirit. We can have a cocktail among friends, or just stop in if we need ice or something to eat,” says Coniglio.

He plans to visit both restaurants during Thursday, when the hurricane is expected to impact Palm Beach County.

“The last time I did this, it was a real eerie feeling. It’s isolated out and the winds are coming through – and a couple of people think you’re really nuts for being out,” he says. “But it was kind of a proud Floridian moment, too. This is where we live and what happens here.”

E.R. Bradley’s Saloon: 104 S. Clematis St., West Palm Beach; 561-833-3520

 

 

 

Readers Choice winner: Who has the best coffee in Palm Beach County?

We admit the question may have teetered upon the unfocused: Who has the best coffee in Palm Beach County?

But you knew what we meant, dear readers, and there was nothing unfocused about your answers. Who has the best coffee, in brew and concept?

Patrons enjoy the cramped confines of Subculture Coffee in West Palm Beach. A lease will give the shop additional space. (Richard Graulich/ The Palm Beach Post)
Subculture prepares for larger Clematis Street digs next month. (Richard Graulich/ Palm Beach Post)

You voted resoundingly for Subculture Coffee, the small-batch roaster and hipster concept with locations in downtown West Palm Beach and Delray Beach.

“It’s really encouraging. As a business owner, you want your product to stand on its own,” says Sean Scott, Subculture co-owner and coffee roaster. He describes the response to his coffee and concept as a kind of “gravitational, community pull.”

Which is to say: a hit. (Also a hit were Oceana Coffee in Tequesta and the Common Grounds coffee shop in Lake Worth, which tied for second place.)

Co-owned by nightlife/restaurant czar Rodney Mayo, Subculture is both a local coffee brand and coffee shop. As a coffee brand, it uses beans harvested in far-flung places (as in Chiriquí, Panama, and Oromia, Ethiopia). Those beans are roasted in Subculture’s industrial Diedrich roaster and produce a wide range of fresh brewed coffee, diverse in flavor depth and weight.

A cappuccino by coffee master Sean Scott, founder Subculture Coffee. (Palm Beach Post file)
A cappuccino by coffee master Sean Scott, founder Subculture Coffee. (Palm Beach Post file)

This is not coffee that can be described as strictly bold or strictly high-octane. “Our coffee changes quarterly, due to seasonality,” says Scott. “I really focus on offering four or five different origins at a time, with each having unique characteristics. I try to roast to enhance those unique qualities in varieties.”

As a shop, its original location on Clematis Street has proven to be a game changer for that main drag’s 500 Block. Living up to its name, the shop has added a chill, creative subculture to the block.

There’s more than just coffee going on at Subculture – the place has nurtured a consistently caffeinated community and brought events like Tacos and Hip Hop to the block. All this in two and a half years.

And there’s more: Within weeks, the Clematis shop will double in size as Subculture expands into the locale next door.

The new space allows Scott the room to host weekly coffee appreciation classes, exploring everything from bean origin to processing technique to brewing.

“It brings coffee to the level of wine. We know that wine is complex. That’s what I want people to know about coffee,” says Scott, who plans to open the space sometime in October. “We want to move beyond the caramel macchiato and further educate our community.”

photo subculture coffee shop
A pair of macchiatos at Subculture Coffee shop in West Palm Beach. (Liz Balmaseda/ Palm Beach Post)

SUBCULTURE COFFEE

In West Palm Beach

  • 509 Clematis St.; 561-318-5182; open Sunday through Thursday from 7 a.m. to midnight, Friday and Saturday to 2 a.m.

In Delray Beach

  • 123 E. Atlantic Ave.; 561-808-8482; open daily from 7 a.m. to midnight

Online: SubcultureCoffee.com

Dim sum review: Why you should indulge in Grand Lake’s weekend tradition

Dim sum at Grand Lake is an adventure of eclectic small bites. (Yuting Jiang/ The Palm Beach Post)
Dim sum at Grand Lake is an adventure of eclectic small bites. (Yuting Jiang/ The Palm Beach Post)

Here’s a compromise for anti-buffet types who love to brunch: a buffet that comes to you. The food is tucked into small tin pots and rolled to your table in a metal cart. Lovers of Hong Kong style cuisine call it dim sum.

Yes, I know you’ve heard about dim sum. But who are we kidding? This isn’t Hong Kong or New York or San Francisco – or any city where dim sum is more a religion than a meal. This is Palm Beach County, where dim sum menus are few and far between.

Luckily for seekers of the real deal, there’s still tasty dim sum to be found at Grand Lake, the 10-year-old Chinese restaurant that sits in a suburban West Palm Beach plaza.

Go-cart driver: The dim sum cart is offered Saturday and Sunday. (Yuting Jiang/ The Palm Beach Post)
Go-cart driver: The dim sum cart is offered Saturday and Sunday. (Yuting Jiang/ The Palm Beach Post)

The Saturday and Sunday dim sum crowds put plenty of mileage on that metal cart. It’s laden with dumplings, finger foods and dim sum favorites.

On a recent visit, I asked my dining companions, two dim sum devotees, to order their favorite dishes. I added a couple of my own (Hello, sticky rice in lotus leaf!) and soon our table was filled with what seemed like the contents of two dim sum carts.

We feasted on plump shrimp dumplings ($4.25), pork sui mei dumplings ($3.95), raggedly finished and greasy fried taro dumplings ($4.25), dense chive dumplings ($4.25), sweet-savory steamed barbecue pork buns ($4.25), chicken feet ($3.95) and rich steamed egg custard buns ($4.25).

In this dumpling landscape, two dishes stood out as must-order: the delicious shrimp dumplings and the sui mei dumplings, which revealed their porky filling through their split tops.

Dim sum delights are tucked into steamy tins. (Yuting Jiang/ The Palm Beach Post)
Dim sum delights are tucked into steamy tins. (Yuting Jiang/ The Palm Beach Post)

Best of all, however, was a bean-curd skin roll stuffed with pork and chopped vegetables ($4.25). The beautifully seasoned filling is wrapped in a thin tofu sheet, steamed and served in a savory sauce.

Also delicious: the sticky rice in lotus leaf ($5.25), moist, nicely seasoned rice that’s wrapped in an aromatic lotus leaf and steamed until fragrant. The result is a dim sum cousin of a cornhusk-wrapped tamal or plantain-leaf-wrapped pastel. The filling takes on an ethereal layer from its steamed wrapping.

A crispy roasted duck dish ($8.50 for a quarter bird, $15.95 for a half) was ample and tasty, though slightly overcooked in parts.

We started our dim sum feast with steaming bowls of fish fillet congee ($7.25), a delicately flavored rice porridge. Hinting of ginger and dotted with chunks of mild white fish, it was downright soul-warming.

As one might guess, we had plenty of leftovers. But before those take-home containers were filled, we enjoyed our dim sum bites amid the chatter of locals in this family-owned restaurant.

No, there’s no bottomless Bloody Mary bar. But we did have a couple of pots of hot chrysanthemum tea. It soothed our full bellies on a lovely Sunday.

Dumplings galore at Grand Lake Chinese restaurant. (Yuting Jiang/ The Palm Beach Post)
Dumplings galore at Grand Lake Chinese restaurant. (Yuting Jiang/ The Palm Beach Post)

REVIEW

DIM SUM AT GRAND LAKE

FOOD: B+

SERVICE: B

ADDRESS: 7750 Okeechobee Blvd. #6, West Palm Beach

TELEPHONE: 561-681-1388

PRICE RANGE: Inexpensive to moderate

NOISE LEVEL: Low key, manageable.

FULL BAR: Beer and wine only

HOURS: Open Sunday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday to 11 p.m. Cart-served dim sum is offered Saturday and Sunday.

CREDIT CARDS: Major cards accepted

RESERVATIONS: Walk-ins welcome

WHEELCHAIR ACCESS: Yes

WHAT THE GRADES MEAN:

A — Excellent

B — Good

C — Average

D — Poor

F — Don’t bother

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Foodie central: village for indie vendors to rise in West Palm industrial zone

Palm Beach County’s foodie city of the moment is about to get more tasty. West Palm Beach might soon be home to a new food and drink-centric district that’s in development along the city’s industrial zone.

Celis Produce is among the vendors at the upcoming Grange Hall. (Credit: Oak Media)
Celis Produce is among the vendors at the upcoming Grange Hall. (Credit: Oak Media)

The Warehouse District, a sprawling complex of vintage buildings, is shaping up to be an eclectic urban village of food and beverage creators and vendors, artists, fitness buffs and other indie entrepreneurs. Developers say they hope to open sometime in December or January.

This district will boast a New York-inspired food hall, Grange Hall Market, as well as what will be the city’s only craft beer brewery, Steam Horse. It’s located in the industrial zone that sits off Elizabeth Avenue, just southwest of the Palm Beach County Convention Center, near downtown West Palm Beach.

The food hall portion of this village is the brainchild of real estate developer Chris Vila, a transplanted New Yorker who envisions a Chelsea Market-type of place that provides locals with one-stop-food-shopping options.

“Locals can do their shopping there, buy their proteins and veggies, and take it all home to cook. Or they can just buy a whole dinner and wine and eat it there,” says Vila, son of home-improvement star Bob Vila of “This Old House” fame.

The District will be home to Steam Horse brewery, sibling to Tequesta and Twisted Trunk breweries. (Cox Newspapers photo)
The District will be home to Steam Horse brewery, sibling to Tequesta and Twisted Trunk breweries. (Cox Newspapers photo)

A covered loading dock will be transformed into a dining and events space, he notes, and a greenway will offer plenty of spots for enjoying a bite. Vila says he’s secured 12 vendors for Grange Hall, among them Rabbit Coffee roasters, Celis Produce vendors, plus a butcher, fishmonger, florist, coffee roaster, taco spot and rotisserie chicken joint.

Central to The District’s larger mission is that the market and other spaces within the complex will nurture independent vendors and artisans.

“Our goal is to have a place where those folks can thrive, expand and grow,” says The District’s developer Hunter Beebe of Johnstone Capital Partners.  “I believe the ultimate synergy will drive success for the entire community. The heart and soul of this is not me or my team, but these tenants.”

One of those indie vendors is Celis Produce, whose owners have nabbed a spot in Grange Hall. It will house Celis’ second location.

The Celis brothers (from left: Felipe, Camilo and Alex) are bringing their organic goods to The District's food hall. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)
The Celis brothers (from left: Felipe, Camilo and Alex) are bringing their organic goods to The District’s food hall. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)

“The concept sounds amazing. I feel it’s what we need here,” says Felipe Celis, who co-owns a West Palm produce delivery and juice bar business with his two brothers. Besides selling produce and some pantry items at the food hall, the Celis brothers plan to sell juices, acai bowls and quinoa bowls for onsite consumption.

The District’s 85,000-square-foot area includes about eight buildings that were constructed between the 1920s and the 1950s, says Beebe.

“There’s a lot of character in those buildings. We bought them all within the last year, and we’ve undertaken this effort to essentially redevelop them,” he says.

Beebe envisions a district akin to Miami’s hip, artistic Wynwood neighborhood, “with a heavy focus on local entrepreneurs, culture, art and food – but not food in the big business kind of way.”

Adding lifestyle layers to The District, his team has signed on an indoor cycling studio, he says. “We will also have the first squash club that West Palm Beach has ever had. We’re excited about that,” says Beebe, who counts art galleries in the mix as well.

While it may seem as if developers are building a brand new neighborhood, Beebe cautions that’s not the case.

“The neighborhood exists. What we’re trying to do it bring it back to life. This is not like CityPlace where you are sprouting up with a (from-the-ground-up) development,” he says, emphasizing that The District’s project seeks to redevelop an area, not build from scratch.

He notes that many of the previous inhabitants of the industrial district were working trades that are now gone.

“A lot of those businesses have gone away, and so the buildings have become less productive,” says Beebe, who splits his time between Palm Beach and New York. “What we saw is this opportunity to reimagine the neighborhood with something that’s consistent with productivity now in West Palm Beach.”

Rabbit Coffee roasters are among the vendors at Grange Hall. (Meghan McCarthy/ The Palm Beach Post)
Rabbit Coffee is among Grange Hall vendors. (Meghan McCarthy/ The Palm Beach Post)

Some of the remnants left behind by previous generations and inhabitants will serve new functions. Take the long-abandoned 1920s rail line that cuts through the property:

“We are developing the Trail Line,” says Beebe, describing a pedestrian swath of green that connects various concepts. “This will become a very active pedestrian greenway.”

West Palm’s quickly emerging food and entertainment scene provides fertile ground for The District’s development, says Vila.

“I think it’s a wonderful time to be here,” he says. “West Palm Beach is growing and can sustain something like this.”

Follow The District’s progress: on Istagram @grangehallmarket and @warehousedistrictwpb

Steam Horse craft beer brewery headed to industrial West Palm Beach

A new brewery will join the emerging craft beer scene next year. (Cox Newspapers)
Steam Horse Brewing will join Palm Beach County’s emerging beer scene next year. (Cox Newspapers)

The craft beer minds behind Tequesta Brewing Company and Twisted Trunk Brewing will join West Palm Beach’s rising food and drink scene next year. They will open Steam Horse Brewing near downtown West Palm Beach, says co-owner Fran Andrewlevich.

The new brewery is headed to The Warehouse District, a sprawling urban complex that’s now under construction in West Palm Beach’s industrial district. When completed, The District will serve as its own mini-neighborhood and will be home to Grange Hall Market, an eclectic food hall, and other food and beverage spots. It’s located in the industrial zone that sits off Elizabeth Avenue, just southwest of the Palm Beach County Convention Center, near downtown West Palm Beach.

Andrewlevich and brewery partner Matt Webster hope to open next year by late spring or early summer. They tapped into the vintage rail theme in naming the new brewery. An abandoned rail spur on the property inspired images of old locomotives billowing great clouds of smoke. And so Steam Horse was born.

The brewery and large tasting room will breathe new, hoppy life into a 6000-square-foot space currently occupied by a cabinet shop. Andrewlevich notes the space, which will be mostly devoted to Steam Horse’s tasting room, is about the same size as Twisted Trunk on PGA Boulevard.

“We’re hoping to get in there by January to start the renovation. Hopefully, permits will move smoothly,” says Andrewlevich, who says building has begun on the brewing equipment for the place.

About the beers to be brewed, the brewmaster promises a “wide variety.” And while the brewery will offer no food, patrons can order from nearby restaurants and have food delivered to the tasting room.

Vintage steam locomotives inspired the brewery's name. (Cox Newspapers file)
Steam Horse: Vintage steam locomotives inspired the brewery’s name. (Cox Newspapers file photo)

Andrewlevich, who was the original brewmaster at the now-defunct Brewzzi brewpub in CityPlace, believes Steam Horse will be the city’s first true brewery.

“I’ve been researching this and I haven’t found any other breweries. Brewzzi was a brewpub, which is different,” he says.

He says he is most excited about joining the city’s burgeoning dining and entertainment scene. Just as Tequesta and Twisted Trunk breweries have their distinctive personalities and crowds, he expects the West Palm brewery to draw from the city’s hipster demographic.

“The market as a whole is young and vibrant and it’s Ubers and people going out. It’s a little trendier, a little more cosmopolitan,” says Andrewlevich. “We just love what’s happening in the restaurant scene, the art scene, the music scene here. Everything that’s alive is here.”

Steam Horse will join an emerging, countywide craft beer scene and native breweries that include Funky Buddha and Barrel of Monks in Boca Raton, Saltwater in Delray Beach, Due South, Copperpoint and Devour in Boynton Beach, plus Tequesta Brewing in Tequesta and Twisted Trunk in the Gardens.

Follow: For Steam Horse updates, follow its siblings, Twisted Trunk and Tequesta Brewing.

‘World’s largest dinner party’ returns to secret West Palm Beach location

Diner en Blanc in full effect in downtown West Palm Beach. (Richard Graulich/ The Palm Beach Post)
Diner en Blanc in full effect in downtown West Palm Beach. (Richard Graulich/ The Palm Beach Post)

Diner en Blanc, the massive secret picnic that invaded the downtown West Palm Beach waterfront last year, will return to an undisclosed location this fall.

The mega event, which is more “flash mob” meets “white party” than a foodie feast, returns Friday, Nov. 4, organizers announced Tuesday.

The location will not be announced until the day of the event, but Diner en Blanc West Palm Beach organizers say the new outdoor venue will accommodate more than 1500 participants.

“For this new edition, we have once again searched the city high and low to find a venue that will ‘wow’ and render this night unique and magical as well as welcome more guests,” Nora David, one of the event’s co-hosts, said via news release.

Revelers in white set up their own tables and fancy food at last year's inaugural Diner en Blanc West Palm.  (Richard Graulich/ The Palm Beach Post)
Revelers in white at fancy tables at Diner en Blanc WPB 2015. (Richard Graulich/ The Palm Beach Post)

Dubbed the “world’s largest dinner party,” Diner en Blanc follows a tradition launched in Paris in 1988 as a casual picnic for friends to reconnect. It has now been replicated in more than 60 countries.

Attending this synchronized fashion spectacle is not as simple as purchasing a ticket. You must be invited to attend. You can get yourself invited by following the local Diner en Blanc folks in social media or schmoozing up a committee member or event volunteer.

Then there’s a labyrinthine registration process, which happens in three phases. And yes, even if you are approved, you pay an admission charge. (See details below.)

Finally, you must pack a full, formal picnic, a table, chairs, and table setting, all of which you must schlep into the venue. (Shuttle buses to the venue are available for registered participants.)

Diner en Blanc is a rain-or-shine event. Those who attended last year were greeted by a deluge of rain, which cleared and ushered in a pleasant night. And for all the stated formalities, the event itself turned out to be far more relaxed than anticipated, in terms of fashion and food.

 

Dressed up for Diner en Blanc WPB 2015. (Richard Graulich/ The Palm Beach Post)
All glammed up for Diner en Blanc West Palm 2015. (Richard Graulich/ The Palm Beach Post)

DINER EN BLANC WEST PALM

The details:

When: Nov. 4

Where: Secret location, to be announced Nov. 4, shortly before the event. Participants will meet at an assigned location and will be escorted to the outdoor venue by a Diner en Blanc volunteer.

Registration: Visit westpalmbeach.dinerenblanc.info/register to register. This is a three-phase process. Phase 1 is for those who attended last year’s event. Phase 2 is for new guests who are referred by Phase I people. Phase 3 is for those who sign up online by Oct. 21 to be on the waiting list.

Small print: Once you are confirmed, you must attend (or you will be barred from future Diner en Blanc events). It’s a rain or shine event.

Dress code: “Elegant and white only,” organizers say. “Originality is encouraged as long as it is stylish and tasteful.”

Table setting: Must be all white. You must bring a table with two white chairs, white tablecloth, stemware and white dinnerware, a picnic basket packed with “fine” food. Only wine or Champagne are permitted (must be reserved through online e-store). No beer or hard liquor. Organizers ask that guests refrain from bringing their own alcohol.

Catering option: Will be offered onsite for a charge. This option can be reserved through the website.

Clean up: After it’s over, take everything with you – including litter.

Info: For more details, visit westpalmbeach.dinerenblanc.info/about. On social media, follow updates at Diner en Blanc – West Palm Beach,  @DinerEnBlancWPB, dinerenblanc_wpb. Hashtags: #dinerenblanc #dinerenblancWPB #debwpb16. To read about Dîner en Blanc and see photos from its events around the globe, visit dinerenblanc.info. 

 

ICYMI: Cholo Soy Cocina restaurant to open this week on West Palm Beach’s Antique Row

Cholo Soy Cocina, a tiny space with epic dreams, is set to open next week on West Palm Beach’s Antique Row, says its chef/owner Clay Carnes.

Carnes, who left his spacious Wellington restaurant, The Grille, to pursue his street-food-joint goals, expects to open Friday, Sept. 23.

He describes the concept as “neo-Andean, Ecuadorean,” inspired by his years working as a hotel chef in Cuenca, Ecuador. On the menu: interesting snacks, small dishes, handmade tortillas crafted of organic, non-GMO white corn grown in Alachua County.

“The thing I’m most excited about is that I can finally start making these tortillas,” says Carnes, who also will be smoking and braising meats and frying tempura fish for taco fillings.

Chef Clay Carnes: Michigan by birth, "cholo" by soul. (Alissa Dragun/ South Moon Photography)
Carnes: Michigan by birth, “cholo” by soul. (Alissa Dragun/ South Moon Photography)

He has designed a menu that’s varied enough to please a range of tastes and diets.

“We will have food options for everybody. We’ll be able to accommodate dietary preferences naturally because our menu is for everybody. If you’re vegan, we have you covered naturally. Whatever crazy trend you’re doing, you’ll be able to do it here,” says Carnes, who will also offer a selection of beer and wine as well as locally brewed kombucha on draft and locally roasted coffee.

Carnes, a Food Network “Cutthroat Kitchen” winner, plans to grow his own herbs, peppers and other veggies on Cholo’s patio, which will likely hold the spillover crowd from the 600-square-foot indoor space. Inside, there will be four tables seating eight to ten guests, plus limited room at the stand-up counter. Patio benches can accommodate another 25.

The cozy, communal factor is all part of Cholo’s street-stand vibe.

Cholo Soy translates to “I am cholo,” Latin American slang for mixed race or mestizo.

CHOLO SOY COCINA

Located at 3715 S. Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach; @cholosoycocina on Instagram; www.cholosoycocina.com.

Hours: Opens Sept. 23 and will keep the following hours: Open Tuesday and Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Thursday and Friday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., Saturday from 3 p.m. to 11 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed Mondays.

 

Glam up your guac: Here’s a recipe for National Guacamole Day!

Kicky mash up: Avocado Grill's ginger guacamole. (Contributed by Jennifer Martinez)
Kicky mash up: Avocado Grill’s ginger guacamole. (Contributed by Jennifer Martinez)

The unexpected can happen when National Guacamole Day falls on a Friday (which would be today). The craving for blinged out, creamy avocado dip and those unruly TGIF thoughts can build – and before you know it, you’re swigging micheladas and diving into a bowl of green goop.

Then again, the unexpected can involve something less basic. It can involve ginger, as does the Ginger Guacamole at Avocado Grill in downtown West Palm Beach.

How does one use ginger in guac? We’ve got the recipe. TGIF, indeed!

Avocado Grill’s Ginger Guacamole

Recipe courtesy of Executive Chef Julien Gremaud.

3 ripe avocados

3 tablespoons lime juice

2 tablespoons diced red onion

2 tablespoons diced tomato

2 tablespoons diced jalapeño

1 ½ tablespoons finely chopped ginger

1 tablespoon Sriracha

3 tablespoons chopped cilantro

Salt and pepper to taste

  1. Slice avocados in half. Discard the seed. Scoop flesh out of shell with a spoon and place in bowl.
  2. Add 1/2 of the lime juice immediately to prevent browning. Use a fork and mash to desired consistency.
  3. Add chopped onion, tomato, jalapeño, ginger, Sriracha, and cilantro. Stir gently to mix ingredients.
  4. Add remainder of lime juice, plus salt and pepper to taste. Stir just slightly, until incorporated.
  5. Serve as a dip with your favorite tortilla chips, or use with your favorite dish.