REVIEW: Water view at ‘Che’ elevates a simple empanada

On a crisp day in Delray Beach, it doesn’t get much better than this: a waterfront view, rosé sipping and tapas noshing, and snippets of rumba adrift on the patio.

Perched on the Intracoastal: Che in Delray Beach. (Contributed by Che)
Perched on the Intracoastal: Che in Delray Beach. (Contributed by Che)

No, it wasn’t a bad way to meet Che, the 3-month-old restaurant perched on the Intracoastal in Delray Beach. The fact that it was still Happy Hour when I got there made the intro even better. That’s the magical period when the restaurant serves 5-buck delicacies such as eggplant chips, long, crispy shavings stacked in surreal patterns.

The sparkling view and delicious starter gave me the feeling that this place would be a good one. Then the server felt the need to overshare. That was moments after he dropped an F-bomb at me – in a good way, I suppose. He used it as an adverb to qualify the word “amazing,” which he used to describe the steaks.

When my dining companion arrived, I brought her up to speed.

“Our server says the steaks are ‘f#*% amazing.’ He’s also ‘f#*% hungover.’”

At Che, a view that screams "Delray Beach!" (Liz Balmaseda/ Palm Beach Post)
At Che, a view that screams “Delray Beach!” (Liz Balmaseda/ Palm Beach Post)

He was charming in the way your party friend from college is charming. But, yes, he was clueless. When I asked about the terrific, smooth and smoky red dipping sauce served alongside Che’s hearty, overstuffed empanada, he said it was a classic Argentinian chimichurri.

It was a delicious twist on the classic condiment, but for the most part, chimichurri is green, a hand-minced garlic, herb and oil sauce. The server told us chimi is always red in Argentina and green in Brazil. Charming, but mistaken.

Che's overstuffed empanada. (Liz Balmaseda/ Palm Beach Post)
Che’s overstuffed empanada. (Liz Balmaseda/ Palm Beach Post)

Condiment theories aside, this was a tasty empanada (two for $9), its crispy fried crust encasing chopped premium beef studded with chopped olives, peppers and egg. And we couldn’t get enough of that smoky red sauce. It was served with a lightly dressed tangle of arugula and sliced baby tomatoes.

This empanada shares the menu with other starters that reflect Che’s South American and Iberian roots. The concept was dreamed up in Buenos Aires and brought to being in Spain by sibling restaurateurs Daniela and Martin Sujoy. Some 15 years later, they have a “Che” family of 15 related restaurants in Spain.

Eggplant chips on the patio at Che. (Liz Balmaseda/ Palm Beach Post)
Eggplant chips on the patio at Che. (Liz Balmaseda/ Palm Beach Post)

The Spanish influence on Che (a Rio de la Plata expression which can mean “hey!” or “bro,” among other things) declares itself in a Galician style octopus appetizer ($11), a gazpacho starter ($8), a plate of cured Iberico meats and cheeses ($15) and a classic seafood paella ($48 for two).

The Argentine inspiration is told in classics such as morcilla (blood sausage, $9), provoleta (grilled provolone, $12) and a heap of grilled steaks, ranging from $29 for brochettes to $64 for a 24-ounce butterflied South American NY strip. We landed somewhere near the middle, ordering the “George V” filet steak ($43), an 8-ounce prime South American tenderloin served with caramelized onions and veggies in a red wine glaze, with a side of potato gratin.

Grass-fed South American rib-eye steak at Che. (Photo: Alissa Dragun)
Grass-fed South American rib-eye steak at Che. (Photo: Alissa Dragun)

To my eyes, 8 ounces never seemed as robust. This filet towered above the veggie sauté. It was large enough to share. It was not as buttery as one might expect from a filet cut, but the steak was tender, a true medium-rare beneath a smoky char.

In the non-beef department, the grilled Pacific King Salmon ($30) did not disappoint. It was prepared medium-rare as well, revealing a moist interior. The salmon is served with nicely grilled asparagus and a black trumpet mushroom risotto that proved better in flavor than in texture. I prefer a creamy, more loose risotto. This one had the consistency of clumpy rice pudding.

Pacific King Salmon is served with risotto. (Photo: Alissa Dragun)
Pacific King Salmon is served with risotto. (Photo: Alissa Dragun)

All this in a menu that also includes wood-fired flat breads ($12). The menu’s range makes this an ideal waterfront spot. You don’t want a steak? Have a fig-blue cheese flat bread and a glass of wine. The setting is outstanding.

The waterfront Delray Beach location, which inhabits the former Hudson at Waterway East property, is the Sujoy family’s first U.S. location. And it is a beauty, with crisp, white walls and chairs, velvety teal booths and banquettes and simple wooden deck touches. Che infused light and just the right amount of teal blue into a dim space.

Soothing tones: Che's decor seems to flow outward. (Photo: Alissa Dragun)
Soothing tones: Che’s decor seems to flow outward. (Photo: Alissa Dragun)

Now those shimmery waters outside find their reflection in the restaurant’s furnishings. The view, it seems, begins inside and flows outward. The minds behind the restaurant’s décor maximized the visual gifts of the place.

Fresh look: Che took over the old Hudson space. (Photo: Alissa Dragun)
Fresh look: Che took over the old Hudson space. (Photo: Alissa Dragun)

What a lucky thing for local lovers of Argentinian and Spanish foods: a place where the empanada comes with one of the best views in South Florida.

REVIEW

Che Restaurant

FOOD: B

SERVICE: C

ADDRESS: 900 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach

TELEPHONE: 561-562-5200

WEBSITE: Delray.CheRestaurant.com

PRICE RANGE: Moderate to expensive

NOISE LEVEL: Lively, but conversation is possible.

FULL BAR: Yes, a full liquor bar; separate bar areas.

HOURS: Open daily from 11 a.m. to 11:30 p.m.

CREDIT CARDS: Major cards accepted

RESERVATIONS: Dinner reservations are strongly suggested.

WHEELCHAIR ACCESS: Yes

WHAT THE GRADES MEAN:

A — Excellent

B — Good

C — Average

D — Poor

F — Don’t bother

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

High marks for Highland Beach seafood restaurant: Latitudes gets an A

James King is executive chef at Latitudes in the Delray Sands Resort. (Bruce R. Bennett/ The Palm Beach Post)
James King is executive chef at Latitudes in Highland Beach. (Bruce R. Bennett/ The Palm Beach Post)

It’s a good sign when a hotel restaurant is bustling, so much so that reservations are strongly suggested, if not required. And it’s an even better sign when that restaurant is busy despite heavy competition from neighboring hot spots and some of the county’s most popular dining districts.

Sandwiched between the hum of Atlantic Avenue in downtown Delray Beach and the stir of eastern Boca Raton’s dining hub, Latitudes is a local sensation. Yes, it doesn’t hurt that the seafood-centric restaurant is perched by the ocean and that daytime views are sparkling.

But I’ve seen my share of empty or half-empty oceanfront resort restaurants. Located in the Delray Sands resort in Highland Beach, Latitudes is decidedly different. And there is one culinary reason for this: Executive Chef James King.

The former Four Seasons Resort chef is well known for creating dishes that are both stunning and delicious. His attention to detail and refined hand is evident in even the simplest dishes.

King arrived at the Delray Sands shortly after the resort (a former Holiday Inn) underwent an extensive remodeling in 2014. He has given the place cuisine to match its sleek, new look. Now it not only reflects the colors of the sea but the flavors as well.

It is here that his team serves some of the best coastal cuisine in the county. It begins with a selection of chilled seafood starters that carry global flavors.

Seared scallop carpaccio is served at Latitudes. (Bruce R. Bennett/ The Palm Beach Post)
Seared scallop carpaccio is served at Latitudes. (Bruce R. Bennett/ The Palm Beach Post)

Find interesting local-meets-global touches in the Scallop Tiradito, a sashimi-like dish that’s scented with saffron, key lime honey, citrus, fried olives and micro cilantro. The Corvina Ceviche brims with kicky Peruvian yellow pepper. The Mini Ahi Tuna Tacos ($15) pack a punch of Asian flavors, thanks to wasabi aioli, citrus-soy vinaigrette and a tangy ginger-scallion salad.

A local favorite is King’s Tuna Poke, a raw yellowfin tuna dish he calls “a hot, hot seller.” His rendition of the Hawaiian classic takes its sweetness from mango, its crunch from macadamia nuts, its deeper hits from fish sauce and rounder flavors from sesame seed butter. (That’s the gray swoosh on the plate.) He adds crispy wonton chips to help scoop up all the goodness.

Tempting tuna: Ahi poke is popular at Latitudes in Highland Beach. (Bruce R. Bennett/ The Palm Beach Post)
Tempting tuna: Ahi poke is a popular starter at Latitudes. (Bruce R. Bennett/ The Palm Beach Post)

Those craving a warm starter will find yummy comfort in Latitudes’ Lobster Bisque ($10), a version that’s not overly rich. Deepened by a touch of smoked paprika oil, the bisque is swimming with lobster chunks.

Not all good bites here are seafood-centric, as evidenced by the Braised Short Rib Empanadas (two for $15), fried hand-pies overstuffed with ancho chile-spiced beef and served with pickled red onions, a swirl of chipotle aioli and a thimble of herb-y, garlicky chimichurri dipping sauce. One empanada – or even half of one – is large enough for an appetizer.

An appetizer that’s large enough to be an entrée is the Scampi Style Maine Lobster and Shrimp ($16), a large soup bowl filled with shrimp, lobster chunks, peas and slivered garlic in rich, saucy scampi goodness. The dish is served with toasted ciabatta slices and a large wedge of lemon for brightening the bite (not that it needs any adjustments). This might have been my favorite bite of the night.

Entrée options are well varied, ranging from “simply prepared” fresh fish served with a choice of flavorful butter, sauce or relishes. For those who want something more than simple fish, there’s a simply Grilled Seafood Trio ($32) that combines a fillet of local fish with tiger prawns and jumbo scallops. A light citrus beurre blanc is offered for dipping along with fresh veggies and roasted garlic mashed potatoes. The entire combo, a popular dish on the menu, is pristine and perfectly cooked.

Not so simply prepared but just as delicious: the Crab Crusted Florida Grouper ($35), a moist fillet made even more flavorful by a layer of toasty-golden crab. It’s served atop a creamy white polenta with a toss of sweet corn and smoked bacon, braised baby spinach and whole carrots. A pool of Florida citrus butter deepens and pulls together the flavors.

Branzino in parchment is a specialty dish at Latitudes. (Bruce R. Bennett/ The Palm Beach Post)
Branzino in parchment is a specialty dish at Latitudes. (Bruce R. Bennett/ The Palm Beach Post)

And there’s a Branzino in Paper ($30) that takes the moist, flaky factor to another level. Because it’s roasted in parchment, the fillet’s delicate flavors are amped. It’s given a Mediterranean treatment with Israeli couscous, Kalamata olives, roasted fennel, confit tomatoes and Meyer lemon tanginess.

It was this dish that became our vehicle to learning about the quality of service at Latitudes. When it was first presented to our table, the paper seemed slightly burned. When the server opened the package, parts of the fillet appeared to be overcooked. A taste of the edges proved our hunch. But before we could say much, our server spirited the fish away.

“I can’t leave it here,” he told us. “This is not an example of who we are or what we do.”

Moments later, he returned with a perfect dish.

Amid the weekend night bustle, this server made sure our glasses were filled, our table was cleared of empty dishes and our whims were met.

All this in a setting of soothing lines and leisurely chatter. The dining room was filled with a mix of diners, a crowd that skewed more Boomer than young hipster. It’s a sexy spot, nice for date night or special occasions, particularly when it’s early enough to catch the last of the day’s sunlight.

It’s a good place for lingering over dessert. At our table that dessert was a batch of hot, puffy beignets ($7) with a blueberry compote and a bourbon creme anglaise, and a dense, sinful praline tart ($9) that made the feast complete.

Ocean view all day: patio seating at Latitudes in Highland Beach. (Bruce R. Bennett/ The Palm Beach Post)
Ocean view all day: patio seating at Latitudes. (Bruce R. Bennett/ The Palm Beach Post)

REVIEW

Latitudes

FOOD: A

SERVICE: A

ADDRESS: At the Delray Sands Resort, 2809 S. Ocean Blvd., Highland Beach

TELEPHONE: 561-278-2008

WEBSITE: LatitudesDelray.com

PRICE RANGE: Moderate to expensive

NOISE LEVEL: Lively, but conversation is possible.

FULL BAR: Yes, a full liquor bar; separate bar area. Happy Hour is served Monday through Friday from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., with drink and small plate specials.

HOURS: Open daily for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Sunday brunch is served from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.

CREDIT CARDS: Major cards accepted

RESERVATIONS: Dinner reservations are strongly suggested.

WHEELCHAIR ACCESS: Yes

WHAT THE GRADES MEAN:

A — Excellent

B — Good

C — Average

D — Poor

F — Don’t bother

 

New waterfront restaurant opens in Delray Beach

Che has taken over the former Hudson at Waterway East in Delray Beach. (Contributed)
Che has taken over the former Hudson at Waterway East in Delray Beach. (Contributed)

A rare Argentinian-owned restaurant has landed on the banks of the Intracoastal in Delray Beach. Che Restaurant opened Monday in the sprawling space formerly occupied by Hudson at Waterway East.

Dreamed up in Buenos Aires, the restaurant concept was brought to life in Spain by brother-sister restaurateurs Daniela and Martin Sujoy. On Spanish soil, they built a Che empire of 15 related restaurants in 15 years. (They include Che Pizza & Pasta, Che Asador Argentino and Che American Style).

Related: Best waterfront restaurants in Palm Beach County

Now comes their first U.S. location in Delray Beach’s buzzy dining district: a restaurant that’s described as part modern steakhouse, part casual international eatery. “Che” is a multipurpose expression common in the Rio de la Plata region. It can mean “hey!” or “bro,” among other things.

“For Delray Beach, we wanted to pay homage to our Argentinian roots while highlighting European inspiration,” said Martin Sujoy via news release.

Che offers various types of paellas similar to this one. (Mia Yakel/ Cox Newspapers)
Che offers various types of paellas similar to this one. (Mia Yakel/ Cox Newspapers)

The Sujoy family got its start in the food industry in Argentina, where they managed country club concessions before opening a financial district restaurant that grew into a catering operation.

At Che Delray, expect dishes with Argentine and Spanish accents on the menu. There are Argentinian classics like choripan (chorizo sandwich), Buenos Aires-style pastas and grass-fed South American steaks with chimichurri sauce. Inspired by Spain, there’s Galician-style octopus and paellas. On the side: sparkling waterfront views.

The Sujoys hired Spanish interior design company Paco Pleguezuelos to breathe new life into the 8000-square-foot space. The result is a sprawling restaurant with inside/outside dining areas and two bars, with plenty of room for large parties in between.

Hours: open from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily.

Che Delray Beach: 900 E. Atlantic Ave.; 561-562-5200; CheRestaurant.com

 

 

Rockin’ pizza, feasts and throwdowns: why chefs love summer

Winning chef Jimmy Strine (Cafe Boulud) at 2015 Chef vs Chef series at Max's Harvest. (Contributed)
Winning chef Jimmy Strine (Cafe Boulud) at 2015 Chef vs Chef series at Max’s Harvest. (Contributed)

Maybe it’s the general ease in restaurant traffic that’s to blame for the displays of creativity by local chefs during summer. It’s the season when chefs tend to indulge their artistic whims more freely, when multicourse dinners can extend into double digits.

This creative spark is evidenced by local throw-downs, such as the late-night Chef vs. Chef battles that recur weekly (Wednesday nights) during summer months at Max’s Harvest. (Max’s Harvest: 169 NE 2nd Ave., Delray Beach; 561-381-9970; MaxsHarvest.com)

The chefs-having-fun motif can be detected on Wednesday late-nights at Grato in West Palm Beach, where chef/co-owner Clay Conley fires up a selection of rock-themed pizzas. At 9:30 p.m. Wednesdays, he cranks up the classic rock and serves up pies with titles like Wavy Gravy (Sunday gravy meat sauce, creamy buffalo cheese, basil), Rocket Man (fontina, Parmesan, tomato, caramelized onion, rocket greens), and L-O-L-A Lola (an oddly shaped, pepperoni-topped pizza). The special pizzas are served only Wednesday nights during Grato Rocks. (Grato: 1901 S. Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach; 561-404-1334; GratoWPB.com)

Rocker in chief: Grato's chef/co-owner Clay Conley. (LibbyVision.com)
Rocker in chief: Grato’s chef/co-owner Clay Conley. (LibbyVision.com)

Elsewhere, there are some notable multicourse feasts. At Jardin, the new-ish, chef-driven eatery on Clematis Street, chef duo Jordan Lerman and Stephanie Cohen (husband/wife) have kicked off Monday night “Chefs’ Grand Tasting” dinners.

And by “grand” they mean 15 courses. The dinners, which run through Aug. 29, are intimate affairs, limited to the first eight guests who reserve each week. The special dinners showcase an imaginative tasting menu (it changes week to week) that’s inspired by local ingredients. Monday grand tastings start at 7 p.m. and cost $100 per person. Add $40 for wine or cocktail pairings. (Jardin: 330 Clematis St., West Palm Beach; 561-440-5273; JardinRestaurant.com)

TwentyTwentyAlFresco
Alfresco dining at TwentyTwenty Grille, Boca Raton. (Contributed)

Meanwhile at Twenty Twenty Grille in Boca Raton, Chef Ron Weisheit’s 15-course summer dinners – offered for 20 guests – are so popular, they’re selling out. Grand tasting dinners at the small eatery are scheduled for June 30, July 1 and July 2. The feast costs $150 per person. (TwentyTwenty Grille: 141 Via Naranja #45, Boca Raton; 561-990-7969; TwentyTwentyGrille.com)

FacebookFeast

Father’s Day: The ‘papa’ behind the tapas in Delray Beach

Cristobal Parra is the "papa" at Delray Beach's popular Papa's Tapas restaurant. (Melanie Bell / The Palm Beach Post)
Papa’s place: Cristobal Parra at Papa’s Tapas, Delray Beach. (Melanie Bell/ The Palm Beach Post)

Cristobal “Papa” Parra rises before dawn each day with a set of purposes: to cook, to work and to love his family. He’s the “Papa” behind Delray Beach’s popular Papa’s Tapas restaurant and the patriarch of a spirited blended brood. 

At 71, he still does the shopping, the prep work, and much of the cooking at the Pineapple Grove eatery. His work ethic has roots in a Spanish port town — and it has spawned roots in his expanded family. Those who call him “Papa” are as grateful as they are devoted to him.

Cristobal Parra is the "papa" at Delray Beach's popular Papa's Tapas restaurant. His crew always claps for him at the end of his shift. Pictured are (left to right) Annie Kolensky, manager and daughter, Michael Darcy, server, Raymond Diverniero, floor manager, Susie Parra, wife and dessets, Cristobal Parra, chef and owner, Yvette Meneses, daughter, chef and kitchen manager and Aldo Mercado, sous chef. (Melanie Bell / The Palm Beach Post)
Bravo: Applause for Cristobal Parra and “Mama” Susie Parra. (Melanie Bell/ The Palm Beach Post)

They show this with a weekly round of applause as he leaves the kitchen.

READ ALL ABOUT PAPA AND HIS TAPAS HERE.

Papa's Tapas' pitchers of homemade sangria pair well with Papa's montaditos (sandwich bites), topped with assorted meats, sausages, anchovies and Manchego cheese, as well as with (in back) Dominican-style chicharrones de pollo con tostones (fried chicken bits with crispy fried green plantains). (Melanie Bell/ The Palm Beach Post)
Homemade sangria pairs well with Papa’s Tapas’ montaditos. (Melanie Bell/ The Palm Beach Post)

Sundy House sizzles on hot Havana Nights

Havana comes to downtown Delray Beach on Thursday nights. The conga line happens at Sundy House, the historic inn best known for weddings and lovely Sunday brunch.

Cuban mojito. (LibbyVision.com)
Cuban mojito.

Now the lush grounds are put to rhythmic use during Havana Nights, a themed weekly event which kicks off at 5 p.m. on Thursdays.

Not only is it lively — there’s a Latin band playing dance tunes and Cuban cigar rollers crafting stogies — it’s a terrific summer deal. For $30 per person, you get Cuban food, a Cuban-style mojito and Cuban rhythms.

Can’t beat that with a timbale stick.

Sundy House: 106 S. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach; 561-272-5678 

Havana Nights: hot moves in Delray Beach. (LibbyVision.com)
Havana Nights: hot moves in Delray Beach. (Photos: LibbyVision.com)

Which Delray restaurant was voted one of the best outdoor spots in America?

photo sundy house
Sundy House boutique hotel is a lushly landscaped urban retreat set in downtown Delray Beach. (Photo by Libby Volgyes/ Special to The Palm Beach Post)

OpenTable recently released their list of ‘100 Best Al Fresco Dining restaurants in America for 2016’ and the Delray Beach eatery that made the list was the ever popular Sundy House. It’s no wonder this historic inn made the list with its backdrop of lush landscape gardens and unique outdoor gazebo table settings.

Related: Best waterfront dining in Palm Beach County

photo sundy house
Brunch offerings at Sundy House in Delray Beach include chicken and waffles with maple-bacon syrup. (Contributed by LibbyVision.com)

The Sundy House also offers one of the best brunch spots in Palm Beach County. The eatery serves a traditional Sunday brunch in a lovely setting which includes views of the property’s lush gardens.

Stand-out brunch offerings are the chicken and waffles with maple-bacon syrup, blue crab Eggs Benedict served on a Southern biscuit, blueberry pancakes and a well-stocked seafood bar.

Sundy House: 106 S. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach; 561-272-5678

 

 

Where to dine on Mother’s Day? Six last-minute options

Josie's heirloom tomato salad with burrata and basil oil. (LibbyVision.com)
Josie’s heirloom tomato salad with burrata and basil oil. (LibbyVision.com)

Haven’t made Mother’s Day dining plans yet? Here are some last-minute options:

Brunch at Josie’s Ristorante

The Boynton Beach Italian restaurant, which recently rolled out a new menu, is offering an a la carte brunch and lunch specials on Mother’s Day, starting at 11 a.m. Reservations are encouraged.

50 MUST-TRY BRUNCH SPOTS IN PALM BEACH COUNTY

On the menu: Eggs Benedict, Italian frittata with artichokes, olives, tomatoes and mozzarella, challah French toast brulee, roasted beef tenderloin hash with sweet potatoes and farm egg, chile-glazed, bacon-wrapped meat loaf, and more.

Josie’s Ristorante: 1602 South Federal Highway (at Woolbright), Boynton Beach; 561-364-9601

Fit for a queen: PGA National Resort and Spa. (Contributed)
Fit for a queen: PGA National Resort and Spa. (Contributed)

PGA National’s Brunch Divine

The Palm Beach Gardens resort is serving a Mother’s Day brunch from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Brunch costs $75 for adults, $25 for kids ages 5 to 12. (Plus tax and tip.) Reservations strongly recommended.

On the menu: honey roasted ham, tom turkey with fixings, whole roasted chicken, salads, smoked salmon, raw bar items, custom-made omelets, short rib Eggs Benny, Belgian waffles, Viennese dessert display,

To sip: Bottomless Bloody Marys or mimosas cost $19 per person.

PGA National Resort: 400 Avenue of the Champions, Palm Beach Gardens; 561-627-4852

Paris in Town Le Bistro, Palm Beach Gardens. (Palm Beach Post file photo)
Paris in Town Le Bistro, Palm Beach Gardens. (Palm Beach Post file photo)

Paris in Town Le Bistro

Mothers get free roses during brunch at this Palm Beach Gardens bistro, located in the Downtown at the Gardens complex.

On the menu: options such as skirt steak and eggs, and crepe Florentine with salad.

Brunch bonus: Frank Cerabino plays French favorites on the accordion.

Paris in Town Le Bistro: 11701 Lake Victoria Gardens Ave. (by carrousel at Downtown at the Gardens), Palm Beach Gardens; 561-622-1616

 

Sunday Funday, it's all about wine at 32 East. (Contributed)
Sunday Funday, it’s all about wine at 32 East. (Contributed)

Sunday Funday at 32 East 

This high-end Delray Beach institution chose Mother’s Day to kick off a new “Sunday Funday” special: Get 50 percent of any bottle of wine under $100 from its extensive selection, or get $50 off any wine bottle over $100.

The special will run until Thanksgiving. The restaurant opens at 5:30 p.m. on Mother’s Day. Reservations, strongly recommended, can be made on OpenTable.com. Parties of eight or larger are asked to reserve by phone.

32 East: 32 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach; 561-276-7868

Meat Market's Asian BBQ Lamb Ribs. (Contributed)
Meat Market’s Asian BBQ Lamb Ribs. (Contributed)

Prix fixe at Meat Market

Palm Beach’s most intimate steak house is serving a special Mother’s Day menu Sunday. The menu, served from 5 p.m., costs $45 (plus tax and tip) per person.

On the menu: starter options include Asian BBQ Lamb Ribs, tuna tartare, Swank Farms tomato salad, daily soup; entrées include Prime New York steak, half roasted chicken, filet mignon, Meat Market prime picanha steak, and daily fish; dessert will be included as well.

To sip: Half-priced bottles of wine are offered for Mother’s Day.

Meat Market: 191 Bradley Pl., Palm Beach; 561-354-9800

Cheeseburger is king at Duffy's. (Contributed)
Cheeseburger is queen at Duffy’s. (Contributed)

Dine at Duffy’s

The local sports grill chain will honor moms with a free glass of wine (with meal purchase) and a $10 gift card to use on a future visit.

Duffy’s Sports Grill: Find a location at DuffysMVP.com

 

Delray restaurant closes to make way for Rack’s Farmhouse Kitchen

Don't call it flatbread: Farmhouse Kitchen's Kale & Cashew "farm flat." (Contributed)
Don’t call it a flatbread: Farmhouse Kitchen’s Kale & Cashew “farm flat.” (Contributed images)

Goodbye, chicken fried steak. Hello, organic kale and apple slaw.

Restaurateur Gary Rack is revamping the Delray Beach space now occupied by his Fat Rooster eatery. Sometime in May, Rack’s Farmhouse Kitchen moves into that Atlantic Avenue spot, bringing with it a “farm-fresh” eating concept with more healthy options.

That means a fade-out of sinful Southern food and fade-in of veggie-laden dishes, salads with names like “Kale Yeah” and flatbreads (“farm flats”) baked with whole grain flour and sprinkled with “power seeds.” That said, Farmhouse seeks to serve meat lovers as well with dishes such as bison meatloaf, grass-fed skirt steak and heritage pork medallions. Fish and chicken offerings will be available as well.

Contributed image.

It will be the second location for the Boca Raton-based Farmhouse Kitchen, which opened at Royal Palm Place in November 2014. This is not the first time Rack switches out one concept for another. Farmhouse replaced Table 42 in Boca.

In addition to serving lunch and dinner, the upcoming Delray spot will serve brunch on Saturday and Sunday.

“Gary Rack carefully considered this transition from Gary Rack’s Fat Rooster to Gary Rack’s Farmhouse Kitchen,” Rack’s GR Restaurant Group said in a news release. “There is an overwhelming positive response from likeminded locals who claim Farmhouse Kitchen is a brand champion.”

Fat Rooster, which serves its final meal on Mother’s Day, had the crow-worthy distinction of serving what one industry magazine called the best chicken sandwich in America.

Farmhouse offers vegan and gluten-free options, as well as meat dishes.
Farmhouse offers vegan and gluten-free options, as well as meat dishes.

That winning sandwich is a stack of sweet potato waffles, Southern-style fried chicken thighs, sorghum, peanut and benne seed slaw and pickled watermelon that’s macerated in jalapeño-infused whiskey.

The “Hen-Loving Waffle” sandwich may soon be gone, but her creator will remain: Chef Matthew Danaher, Rack’s restaurant group’s culinary director, oversees Farmhouse Kitchen.

FARMHOUSE KITCHEN: 399 SE Mizner Blvd. (Royal Palm Place), Boca Raton; 561-826-2625; FarmhouseKitchenBoca.com

Five places for hot coffee on a rainy day

An Italian espresso at C Street Cafe. (Photo by Liz Balmaseda)
An Italian espresso at C Street Cafe. (Photo by Liz Balmaseda)

It’s rainy outside today. A good time to get some coffee.

1. C Street Café

This cozy coffee shop welcomes you with a laid-back, urban vibe and freshly brewed coffee. Can’t go wrong with an Italian espresso.

  • C Street: 319 Clematis St., West Palm Beach; 561-469-9959; on Facebook here
Barista Amy Duell makes Japanese Cold Brew at Oceana Coffee in Tequesta. (Richard Graulich / The Palm Beach Post)
Barista Amy Duell makes Japanese Cold Brew at Oceana Coffee in Tequesta. (Richard Graulich / The Palm Beach Post)

2. Oceana Coffee

The cold brew at this Tequesta roaster is clean and sublime. And now you can enjoy it at Oceana’s spiffy new coffee lounge.

  • Oceana Coffee: New coffee lounge at 150 N. US Highway 1, #1 (across from the Marshall’s/Homegoods store), Tequesta; roasting house at 221 Old Dixie Highway, Tequesta; 561-401-2453; OceanaCoffee.com
A cappuccino made with The Rabbit coffee at Brewhouse Gallery. (Photo by Liz Balmaseda)
A cappuccino made with The Rabbit coffee at Brewhouse Gallery. (Photo by Liz Balmaseda)

3. Brewhouse Gallery

As you peruse the works of local artists or listen to some live music, treat yourself to a yummy cappuccino made with The Rabbit’s locally roasted Guatemalan beans. It’s so delicious, I could sip it by the gallon.

A couple of macchiatos at Subculture Coffee. (Photo by Liz Balmaseda)
A couple of macchiatos at Subculture Coffee. (Photo by Liz Balmaseda)

4. Subculture Coffee

This hipster hang on Clematis Street brews some delicious coffees that are roasted onsite. My favorite preparation: the macchiato, a bold café with the slightest puff of milk foam. South county folks can enjoy their Subculture brews at the new-ish second location in downtown Delray Beach.

  • Subculture: In West Palm Beach at 509 Clematis St. (561-318-5142), in Delray Beach at 123 E. Atlantic Ave. (561-808-8482); SubcultureCoffee.com
A latte from The Grind Cafe in Delray Beach. (Photo by LibbyVision.com)
A latte from The Grind Cafe in Delray Beach. (Photo by LibbyVision.com)

5. The Grind Café

This Delray Beach spot serves some yummy – and artistic – lattes. Sip one from one of The Grind’s branded retro cups while you decided if you’ll succumb to the café’s baked good temptations.

  • The Grind: at the Delray Marketplace, 14859 Lyons Rd., #132, Delray Beach; 561-270-2058; GrindCafeDelray.com

TWITTER: @LizBalmaseda

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