Football food: Make tachos, the lovechild of tater tots and nachos

Tachos are the lovechild of tater tots and nachos. (Credit: Oxmoor House)
Tachos are the lovechild of tater tots and nachos. (Credit: Oxmoor House)

Only those who truly love football and food with equal passion can appreciate a heap of Tachos. The guilty pleasure mashup dish is, in effect, the well-accessorized lovechild of tater tots and nachos.

Tachos shares the newly published “The Hungry Fan’s Game Day Cookbook” (Oxmoor House, $22.95) with other decadent, made-for-sports-watching dishes, such as Shepherd’s Pie Quesadilla Bites, an Irish-Mexican mashup.

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The book’s author, sports mega-fan Daina Falk, who operates HungryFan.com, a site for sports-loving foodies, tapped into the game-day cravings of sports fans.

“There’s nothing better than cheering on your team at deafeningly loud decibels while chowing down on ‘sportsfood’ yummies,” she writes.

Which brings us to Tachos. Here’s the recipe. You’re welcome!

TACHOS

The following recipe and note are reprinted from Daina Falk’s “The Hungry Fan’s Game Day Cookbook” with permission of Oxmoor House.

“You’ve heard of nachos. You’ve heard of tater tots. Combining them creates sheer taste bud amazingness in the form of what I call ‘Tachos.’ The key to this recipe is that the tater tots must be served really crispy and hot. This dish is goopy, so you really want your tots to hold up to the cheesy yumminess like tortilla chips would.”

6 ounces dried chorizo, diced

1⁄2 cup Negra Modelo, or another dark beer

16 ounces extra-sharp cheddar cheese

1 serrano pepper, seeds and veins removed, minced

1 (4-ounce) can diced green chiles, drained

2 tablespoons thinly sliced green onions

3 cups tater tots

2 tablespoons plain Greek yogurt or sour cream

1⁄4 cup salsa

1 tablespoon minced fresh cilantro

Freshly ground black pepper, optional

GDC full cover 0602acj.indd1. Cook the chorizo over medium in a large saucepan for 8 to 10 minutes, until crisp and the fat has rendered. Transfer to a paper towel–lined plate to drain, and discard the rendered fat.

2. Heat the beer in the same saucepan over high for about 5 minutes to reduce it a bit. Reduce the heat to low, and add the cheese, stirring often as it melts into the beer. Once fully melted, add the fresh and canned chiles, 1 tablespoon of the green onions, and half the chorizo.

3. Bring to a simmer for 1 hour and 10 minutes.

4. Meanwhile, bake the tater tots in a preheated oven according to package directions, making sure to cook them to their crispiest.

5. Place the tater tots on a large tray, and drizzle the cheese sauce on top. Dollop with the yogurt and salsa. Top with the remaining chorizo and green onions and the cilantro. Feel free to sprinkle with some freshly ground black pepper, too, and then serve immediately.

Makes 1 large plate

A dreamy recipe to celebrate National Mousse Day

Daisy Martinez's “Sweet Earth” chocolate mousse cups with chocolate cookie crumbles are topped with edible flowers. (Photo: Joseph De Leo)
Tierrita Dulce: Daisy Martinez’s “Sweet Earth” chocolate mousse cups. (Photo: Joseph De Leo)

Got chocolate mousse on the brain? No wonder: Today is National Mousse Day. Here’s a yummy rendition, created by Daisy Martinez, the talented chef, cookbook author and culinary TV star.

‘TIERRITA DULCE’

(Sweet Earth)

Chocolate Mousse with Chocolate Cookie Crumbles

(Serves 6 to 8, depending on size of pots)

INGREDIENTS:

One 12-ounce bag bittersweet chocolate chips

2 tablespoons dark rum

1¼ tablespoons instant espresso powder

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Pinch of salt

3 extra-large eggs, separated

3⁄4 cup sugar

1 cup heavy cream, well chilled

2 packages Oreo Thin Crisps chocolate cookies or 1¼ cups crushed Famous Chocolate Wafers

6 to 8 edible flowers, with stems if possible, or candy flowers (from a bakery supply shop)

TO MAKE:

 

1. Mix the chocolate chips, rum, espresso powder, vanilla, salt, and ¼ cup water in a large heatproof bowl. Set over a pot of simmering water and whisk until the chocolate is melted. Set aside.

2. Using a hand mixer, beat the egg yolks with ¼ cup of the sugar in a medium bowl until they are pale yellow and fluffy and you can see the bottom of the bowl as you beat, about 2 minutes. Fold about one-third of the chocolate mixture into the yolks with a rubber spatula, then fold the yolk mixture into the chocolate remaining in the bowl. Set aside.

3. Wash the beaters and bowl thoroughly and dry them. Beat the egg whites with the remaining ½ cup sugar in a medium bowl until they hold soft peaks when the beaters are lifted. Fold one-third of the whites into the chocolate mixture with a rubber spatula. Once they are incorporated, fold in the remaining whites.

4. Beat the cream in a clean bowl until it holds firm peaks. Using a rubber spatula, fold the cream into the chocolate mixture one-third at a time. Divide the mousse among 6 to 8 food-safe flowerpots (see Note) or dessert cups. Chill for at least 2 hours or up to 1 day.

5. Put the cookies in a heavy resealable plastic bag. Whack them with a rolling pin into coarse pieces, then roll until fine crumbs. Top each dish of mousse with crumbled chocolate cookies to resemble soil. Finish with the edible flowers, standing them straight up by inserting the stems into the mousse.

NOTE: Food-safe flowerpots are available in specialty bakeware shops, or feel free to use ramekins.

(Prep time: 45 minutes, plus 2 to 24 hours chilling time)

Recipe from “Daisy: Morning, Noon and Night — Bringing Your Family Together with Everyday Latin Dishes” (Atria Books). 

 

Jack and Barbara Nicklaus share favorite recipes in new cookbook

Barbara and Jack Nicklaus with daughter Nan O'Leary. (Allen Eyestone/ Palm Beach Post staff)
Barbara and Jack Nicklaus with daughter Nan O’Leary. (Allen Eyestone/ Palm Beach Post staff)

Food stories have a way of rising like a cheese soufflé in the Nicklaus family kitchen. They linger as long as loved ones around the kitchen island in the Lost Tree Village home where golf legend Jack Nicklaus and his wife Barbara have lived for nearly 50 years, raising four sons and a daughter and feeding 22 grandchildren.

Now those stories are tucked into their newly released cookbook, “Well Done! Life, Love & Food.” Peppered with favorite anecdotes and handed-down recipes, the self-published book offers a glimpse into the family that sat around the dinner table nightly for home-cooked meals, no matter the day’s bustle.

The family meals, inspired by Barbara’s stacks of community cookbooks and jotted-down recipes, unfolded just a stone’s throw from the stretch of State Road A1A that in 2006 was renamed Jack Nicklaus Drive.

Barbara Nicklaus' red velvet cake has a backstory the family loves to tell. (Allen Eyestone/ Palm Beach Post staff)
Barbara Nicklaus’ red velvet cake has a backstory the family loves to tell. (Photo: Allen Eyestone)

When the idea to publish a cookbook came up as a way to raise funds for The Nicklaus Children’s Health Care Foundation, their powerhouse charitable foundation, Barbara turned to a trusty recipe binder daughter Nan O’Leary had compiled for her in the late 1990s.

“The book would not have happened if not for Nan,” she says. Sales of the book, which costs $39.99, benefit the charitable foundation.

Read the full story and find the recipe for Barbara Nicklaus’ red velvet cake (and how it inspired a favorite family anecdote) here.

Rich, creamy and dreamy: ‘The Cuban Table’s’ flan de leche

"The trick to a great Flan de Leche begins and ends with the caramelo," the caramel syrup, writes author Ana Sofia Pelaez in her debut cookbook, "The Cuban Table." (Photo by Ellen Silverman reprinted by permission of St. Martin's Press)
“The trick to a great Flan de Leche begins and ends with the caramelo,” the caramel syrup, writes author Ana Sofia Pelaez in her debut 2014 cookbook, “The Cuban Table.” (Photo by Ellen Silverman reprinted by permission of St. Martin’s Press)

This dessert is silky and velvety at once. It’s a caramelo dream, proof that not all “love” desserts have to be made of chocolate.

FLAN DE LECHE
Milk Flan

This recipe is reprinted from the 2014 cookbook “The Cuban Table” (St. Martin’s Press, $35), by writer Ana Sofia Pelaez and photographer Ellen Silverman.

“The trick to a great Flan de Leche begins and ends with the caramelo – the sugar heated slowly over a steady flame until it reaches just the right amber hue without becoming bitter.” – Ana Sofia Pelaez, author and creator of the Hungry Sofia blog.

Serves 8 to 10

3/4 cup sugar
For the custard
2 1/2 cups whole milk
One 12-ounce can evaporated milk
1 1/2 cups sugar
1 whole cinnamon stick
1 whole vanilla bean, split lengthwise, or
1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
1 lemon peel, white pith removed
1/8 teaspoon kosher salt
6 large eggs

Special equipment:

7- to 8-inch flanera or round metal cake pan (preferably 3 inches deep)

CubanTableBookJacket

Make the flan:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Pour 3/4 cup of sugar into a flanera or metal mold. Place the mold over medium heat and move constantly, without stirring, until the sugar melts and takes on a deep amber hue, 5 to 8 minutes. Remove the mold from the heat and swirl the caramel so that the bottom and sides are lightly covered. The caramel will be very hot and should be handled carefully. Set aside.

Combine the whole milk, evaporated milk, sugar, cinnamon, vanilla bean, lemon peel and salt in a heavy 4-quart saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat. Remove the saucepan from the heat and allow the spices to steep until the milk is cooled to room temperature, about 30 minutes. Discard the cinnamon, vanilla bean, and lemon peel.

Combine the cooled milk mixture and eggs in a mixing bowl and whisk until well combined. Carefully pour the custard into the prepared mold. Close the lid of the flanera, if using, or cover the mold with aluminum foil.

Prepare a baño de María: Place the filled mold in a larger roasting pan. Pour enough hot water into the pan so that it comes about halfway up the sides of the mold.

Carefully place both pans in the oven and bake for 60 to 75 minutes, until a knife inserted into the center comes out clean. Allow the custard to cool completely then refrigerate, covered, at least 4 hours or overnight.

To unmold, run a thin knife along the side of the mold. Gently shake the mold to loosen the flan.

Place a large plate over the flan and quickly invert the mold in one motion.

The flan will gently drop onto the plate and the caramel will flow out.

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